Isaiah

Ack, this is bad.  I was doing so well for the first half of last year, and I certainly slowed down in the second half, but still.  I didn’t expect my progress on Isaiah to be this close to the speed of molasses.  Slllooowly dripping molasses.  It’s not entirely unexpected though.  The last few books I’ve read have been in the short to medium length range, which spoiled me a little.  Isaiah, however, was 66 chapters.  Combine a long book with content quality that is somewhere between mind-numbing and nearly useless, and you’ve got me taking 4 full months to complete the damn thing (and then even longer to write this review).  Well, and an extremely busy and stressful stretch at work certainly has not helped either.

Why are Isaiah's eyes so bloodshot here??

Why are Isaiah’s eyes so bloodshot here??

But honestly, Isaiah felt like such a waste of time that it had me wondering where it would rank in a “Most Useless Bible Books” list.  The books that have felt very useless to me thus far have been the ones that a) rehashed stories from previous books (e.g. 1st and 2nd Chronicles), and b) were very repetitive and added very little new information or revelations that hadn’t already been covered in previous books (e.g. Psalms).  Isaiah, for the most part, is guilty of BOTH of these things (though I know Christians will disagree with me on this for one specific reason, which I address in the “Interesting Stuff” section a little ways down this review).

This book is named Isaiah because it is supposedly told by the 8th century prophet Isaiah ben Amoz.  Wikipedia has a good breakdown of the book’s story sections:

  • Proto-Isaiah (chapters 1–39), containing the words of Isaiah
  • Deutero-Isaiah (chapters 40–55), the work of an anonymous 6th-century author writing during the exile
  • Trito-Isaiah (chapters 56–66), composed after the return from exile.

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