Lamentations

Well hello there.  Hi friend.  I’m back.

Considering how long it has taken me to read and review the last few books, I finished this one at warp speed, relatively.  That may or may not have something to do with the fact that Lamentations was 5 chapters.  As opposed to Jeremiah’s 52 and Isaiah’s 66.

What can I say about Lamentations?  Well, here’s what it has going for it, other than brevity: its name describes its subject matter to a T.  This book is traditionally believed to be the lamentations Jeremiahs_lamentations_1382-1280of Jeremiah regarding the destruction of Jerusalem.  Although according to Wiki, it’s no longer generally accepted that Jeremiah actually is the author.  No matter.  Point is, someone is sad about the destruction of Jerusalem and the people of Judah, and he is writing about it in the form of 5 poems (I say “he” because if the Bible has taught us nothing else, it’s that women are generally useless for anything other than bearing children and helping to clear the way for the men to take charge).

Wiki also points out that God doesn’t speak in this book at all, which I didn’t even notice until now.  Considering how pissed off and murderous God was in the last several books (err, most of the Bible books so far), he is not someone I missed in the least here.  It’s just the author (maybe or maybe not Jeremiah) lamenting about how badly God screwed the Jews over, and then, later, saying, “Oh well, I guess we deserved it.”

I’m not even gonna bother with a “Good Stuff” and “Bad Stuff” section for this book, because it’s short and there really isn’t anything that could be described as “good” here.  It’s actually annoying, because at first the book tricks you into thinking that the author is legitimately taking God to task for his insanity, with verses like the following:

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